Kelanie Black Named Among Best of Autumn Reading, Sheds Light on Blindness Awareness Month

Blind and Free: The Red Lair Book 3 by Kelanie Black

Blind and Free: The Red Lair Book 3 by Kelanie Black

by Fran Briggs

In 2018, 22-year-old, Kelanie Black wondered if she, being blind, could write a book.
By 2020, days before graduating from Otterbein University with a degree in psychology, she had written four.”

— Fran Briggs

NEW YORK, NY, USA, October 15, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — Kelanie Black has received one of the season’s highest literary honors, her publicist announced today. The author of "Blind and Free: The Red Lair Book 3" was recently recognized as being among "The Best of Autumn Reading, 2020."

The complete list was released to international media outlets earlier this month.

The announcement coincides with Blindness Awareness Month which is observed each October.

A short synopsis was used to enter the award-winning, novel: After a vicious assault results in Mistress Jakita being robbed of her sight, her entire life is thrown onto an emotional ride of turmoil.

"Blind and Free: The Red Lair Book 3 certainly deserves the interest of avid, suspense readers,” stated Fran Briggs, Publicist to Kelanie Black. “Kelanie is an incredibly talented author who is receiving some well-deserved, national attention.”

Blindness Awareness Month is reserved for educating the public about the diseases that cause blindness. But it also celebrates the enormous capacity for achieving by those who have experienced a loss of vision.

The cultural misconception is that “blindness” is often presented as an incapacitating disability. In truth, many who are visually impaired live fulfilling and joyful lives.

In 2018, 22-year-old, Kelanie Black wondered if she, being blind, could write a book.

By 2020, days before graduating from Otterbein University with a degree in psychology, she had written four books.

The Cleveland, Ohio native has been blind since birth and is raising public awareness about blindness.

Her aim is to teach others how to avoid creating circumstances of cringe, and pulse-racing encounters. The future child psychologist offered these guiding principles when engaging with the blind.

"It is the responsibility of the visually impaired to educate the public. We do what people who have sight do; just differently, explained Kelanie Black. "Do not assume we need help; we have abilities. We prefer that you ask before you take our arm or hand. Finally, it is not necessary to speak extremely loud if we don't have trouble hearing."

Her words convey two traits which nearly all populations share: a secure foundation of safety, and the desire to be understood.

"Kelanie began reading braille at 4-years-old," says Briggs. "As a percussionist, she played the snare drums for Ohio State School for the Blind in Columbus. She enjoys reading, html coding and producing videos. She's remarkable."

Black speaks melodically as she recalls marching in the Rose Bowl Parade with the Ohio State Marching Band, USC Trojan Marching band, and more than a dozen other bands.

"I have achieved some spectacular things in life, including being a part of the Ohio State School for the Blind Marching Band," she says with a voice buoyed with a hint of nostalgia. "We marched for five and a half miles without taking a break. We proved we could march along with other bands with no problem."

For more information, or to purchase a copy of Blind and Free: The Red Lair Book 3, visit https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08JY88PD3/ Kindle and Audible. For bookings and interviews contact Fran Briggs at FranBriggs@aol.com

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Source: EIN Presswire